AND the winner is…

The name Cindy’s favorite batting contest was a success!  There were 50 replies and 45 correct replies.

In case you didn’t know, my favorite battings are:

Hobbs Thermore and Quilter’s Dream Cotton (request thickness)

Last night I had an impartial judge pick a name from the correct people that answered.

Christine's new puppy, Louie

Christine’s new puppy, Louie

Louie is adorable and so well behaved for a puppy.  We love him already!  Anyway, Louie got his nose in the box with the enteries and actually picked one!

Louie chooses a winner!

Louie chooses a winner!

A paper flew onto the floor…

Only one fell out!

Only one fell out!

And the winner is…  MARTHA SANCHEZ!  Congratulations, Martha!  Martha is a dear friend, fabulous quilter, and knitter!  I know she will enjoy using the batting.

And for all of you that entered the contest, THANK YOU!  Love my readers and wish I could give you all a batting prize.

Stay tuned next week for a peek at some new designs I’m working on…

CONTEST! Name Cindy’s favorite battings!

Hi, everyone!

Recently, I had a student asked me what batting I used?  I saw she had a copy of my hand quilting book sitting at her place, I asked her, “Did you read my Tiny Stitches book?”  She sheepishly replied she hadn’t.

I told the people in class that I could help EVERYONE’S hand quilting by changing them to a better batting choice.

So, here is the deal…  You must respond to this blog by repling below (DO NOT email me personally, please) and tell everyone my favorite battings.  I’ll take enteries until April 4.  I’ll announce the winner on April 5th.  I’m sure there will be more than one correct responder, so I’ll do a random drawing of the winning enteries.  And here is what you will win…  A package of my favorite polyester batting and a small package of my favorite cotton batting!

Good luck!

Mountain Quiltfest

I just got home from Pigeon Forge’s “Mountain Quiltfest”.  I love this particular show and love teaching at this event.  Next year they are planning their 20th anniversary at the new civic center.  I’ll be teaching along with my buddy, Jo Morton!  I’m not sure when they will choose classes or let you sign up for them, so check the website www.mypigeonforge.com later this year.  Worth coming to East TN for this show and venue.

Of course, what is a quilt show without quilts!  I managed to snap a few student photos from former class projects.  I’m so proud of my students!  A big fat thanks to all who brought in their quilts.

Donna Spencer wowed me with a beautiful churn dash quilt.  The embroidery is from the "bears and berries" pattern.

Donna Spencer wowed me with a beautiful churn dash quilt. The embroidery is from the “Bears and Berries” pattern.

There are 5 rows of 11 blocks in this stunning quilt.  Donna made an applecore quilt last year out of thirties fabrics that was also so stunning.  Great work!

Sharon Francisco also took last year’s churn dash class and made this great sampler.

I especially love her choice of fabrics.

I especially love her choice of fabrics.

Bernadette Pohlmann did an extraordinary job on her “Mountain Blossoms” quilt.

The hand quilting on this quilt was fabulous.

The hand quilting on this quilt was fabulous.

I will end this blog with showing you my favorite quilt in the show made by my friend, Linda Roy.  She won a blue ribbon for “Icing on the Cake”.  Linda and I make all our quilts by hand and this particular quilt has everything you want to see in hand work.  Linda’s work is known all over and we are lucky she lives in Knoxville.

You can look at Linda's quilt for hours and still not see everything!

You can look at Linda’s quilt for hours and still not see everything!

Here is a close up view of one of the sections.  BEAUTIFUL!

Linda is a master at her craft.

Linda is a master at her craft.

 

 

Stamping Steps

I was looking through my posts and realized I had left out one very important lesson…  Stamping out your projects!

Many of you have taken my classes and know this information, but many of you haven’t so I’m putting it in this post to clear up any misunderstandings.  (And it is a great reference for those of you that haven’t used the stamps, yet.)

Place your fabric FACE DOWN!  You will always be stamping on the wrong side of the fabric.

I always lay out my fabric with the LENGTHWISE grain at the top of my rotary cutting mat.  ALL THE STAMPS HAVE FINGERHOLDS AND THE FINGERHOLDS ARE MEANT TO BE PLACED PARALLEL TO THE LENGTHWISE GRAIN.  (If you need a refresher on the grain lines, refer back to my blog post on borders.)

Lengthwise Grain

Lengthwise grain is at the top of the square.

Lengthwise grain is at the top of the square.

Next, tap your stamp on top of the ink pad.  The pads are raised for easier stamping.  If you are using a large stamp, tap GENTLY across the pad.  If you have too much ink, use a paper towel and remove the excess and restamp.  (You can tell you have used too much or stamp too hard if you have excess ink in the middle of your design that you stamped.)

Tap gently across the pad.

Tap gently across the pad.

Place your fingers in the fingerholds and press straight down with the stamp.  Reink each time you stamp.

Cut out your pieces on the OUTSIDE line and stitch on the inside line.

Cut out on the outside line.

Cut out on the outside line.

And a word about the ink I use…  I use FABRIC ink.  It is permanent, won’t wash out, won’t bleed through unless you are stamping too hard.  It IS archival, which means it is acid free so it won’t deteroriate your fabric in years to come.  I don’t heat set my fabric after stamping.  I did a test years ago to see if it mattered and it didn’t, so I skip this step, although you can press it after stamping if you feel like it.

I use high quality versa craft ink.

I use high quality versa craft ink.

I find that the chocolate brown color will cover about 80% of the fabrics I stamp, but sometimes I need the white.  Each pad is preinked with enough ink to stamp out at least 2 small quilts if you keep the cover on between stampings and leave it upside down in a plastic bag.  Reinkers are available if you need to freshen your pad.  I can refresh about 50 times with one little reinker.  Of course these are available on my website!

To clean your stamps, use a “wet one” or a baby wipe, dry with a paper towel and you are done!

Happy stamping to you this week!

 

 

 

Snowy B’Day!

Hi, friends!

I’m departing from my regular posts to bring you some wonderful snow pics from TN!  It is such a wonderful birthday surprise.  Yes, today is my b’day and I’m celebrating with you!

This is looking at my back yard.

This is looking at my back yard.

 

Even my pond angel is snowy.

Even my pond angel is snowy.

These are views from my studio.  How can I concentrate when it is so beautiful outside.  It makes me want to run out and build a snowman!

View from the living area. Hey, what happened to the mountains?

View from the living area. Hey, what happened to the mountains?

 

Okay, I’m leaving to go outside.  Hope you all have a lovely day on me!  Birthday hugs all around!

 

 

 

Pressing and Borders (Part 2)

A couple weeks ago we covered pressing your blocks (and quilts).  Now to the important part of getting a perfectly flat border…

The first step is to measure your quilt from edge to edge (including the seam allowances).  Write the measurement down.  (Check both dimensions even if the quilt is square.)  If you have different measurements on a square quilt, take an average.

Measure edge to edge.

Measure edge to edge.

My piece measured 14 1/4″.  Divide this number by 2 making your cutting number 7 1/8.  Keep this number handy.

Cut ALL borders parallel to the selvage (lengthwise grain) the width you choose.  This prevents warping of the borders and will keep your quilt flat.  Fold your borders in the middle.  (You can stack a couple at a time if you wish.)  Measure out from the fold your divided number.

Measure out from the fold 7 1/8" and mark.

Measure out from the fold 7 1/8″ and mark.

 

Here is the important part…  Cut out from the fold using a 45 degree ruler.

 

Cut out from the mark.

Cut out from the mark.

 

Sew the borders onto the quilt top stopping at the 1/4″ mark.

Sew the borders onto the quilt, leaving the miters free.

Sew the borders onto the quilt, leaving the miters free.

 

Lastly, stitch the borders together, taking care not to catch in the corners of the quilt.

Sew just the 2 adjacent borders together.

Sew just the 2 adjacent borders together.

Turn your quilt over and give it a final press.  Lovely, flat borders and NO STRETCHING!  Your quilt will be an award winner!  Feel free to share these tips with your quilt making friends.

 

 

 

A week at JC Campbell

I took a vacation last week and went to JC Campbell Folk School in Brasstown, NC.  What a wonderful place!  If you have never been or heard of the folk school, check it out at www.folkschool.org.  It is a fabulous place to take a workshop from great teachers.  The reason I went was to take a fair isle knitting class from my favorite knitting teacher, Martha Owen.  She owns the yarn shop near the school called “The Yarn Circle”.  www.yarncircle.com.   She also spins, knits, raises sheep, dances, tells stories and teaches knitting.  I love her teaching style.  Martha gave a history of fair isle knitting and then we dove into color.  She explained about selecting the right yarn and colors for fair isle knitting.

Martha explains about choosing colors.

Martha explains about choosing colors.

Next we made swatches and tested out our needle size.  With Shetland music playing in the back ground and taking ample tea breaks, we started in on our projects.  Now at this point, you might be saying, “Why the heck is Cindy taking a knitting class?”  Well, wait until you see some fair isle knitting!  It is so close to our quilting patterns, you have to ask yourself, what came first the patchwork or the knitting?

Patterns for knitting are so similiar to quilting!

Patterns for knitting are so similiar to quilting!

Another great example…

Looks like the "snowball" block to me!

Looks like the “snowball” block to me!

One of the highlights of our class was a field trip to Martha’s farm.  What fun to see the sheep that make the yarn that we buy!  She raises many types of sheep.  She has the wool carded and then spun (or she spins it herself) into wonderful unique yarn that you can purchase at her shop.  We were delighted to purchase some of “Derrick’s” yarn that Martha spun herself.  (You can also get some wonderful cream color from Eudora.)

What a face!

What a face!

Derrick's fleece is shades of gray.

Derrick’s fleece is shades of gray.

I left the school relaxed and energized.  I promise I’ll write part 2 of borders next week.  Until then, relax, have a cup of tea and enjoy the flock!

So much wool, so little time!

So much wool, so little time!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pressing and Borders (Part 1)

A great question came up this week from someone making my honeycomb stars quilt.  She didn’t press the little blocks as she made them and wanted to know about pressing the quilt now that it was finished.  It brings me to question of when to press and when NOT to press your blocks.

It all has to do with GRAINLINE and stretching out the blocks.  When you stamp out your pieces, you ALWAYS align the fingerholds of the wood with the LENGTHWISE grain.  (No stretch)

The Lengthwise grain is parallel to the selvage edge.

The Lengthwise grain is parallel to the selvage edge.

I’ve figured out where the grainline should be for all the quilt blocks we make with my stamps and have had the rubber placed accordingly.  If you stamp on the crosswise grainline you can stretch out the pieces as you sew and you will struggle to piece them onto the ajoining piece(s).

Most of the time, your finished block will have either the lengthwise or crosswise grain along the edge.  If so, go ahead and press the block face down on your ironing board, being careful not to stretch it.  You should press the seams together, do not open.  I did, BTW, press each little honeycomb star as I went along, even though one edge of the diamond was on the lengthwise grain and one was not.  I was VERY careful not to stretch them.  Is it wrong to wait until the quilt is entirely pieced?  No, not at all, it just means spending more time at the ironing center when you are finished.

Press the seams as flat as you can.  Notice the star is pressed around in a circular motion.

Press the seams as flat as you can. Notice the star is pressed around in a circular motion.

Don’t worry if you have a few “twisted seams” when you press.  It is going to happen.

Turn the piece over and give it a good press, using steam.

Turning the quillt over and give it a final press.

Turning the quilt over and give it a final press.

 

Now you are on your way to successful pressing!

Next week I’ll be out of town, but when I get home, I’ll post my favorite tips for cutting the borders, mitering the corners and getting your piece to lie FLAT every time!

 

 

 

 

Quilting Tips

Last week we had an ice storm in East TN.  It gave me an opportunity to sit and finish quilting my new Star Garden.  (See the home page for a full picture.)  Here is the view from my back window onto the deck.

View from my back window.

View from my back window.

 

I put on a pot of tea and baked some scones to eat while quilting.  When I got to the border, I thought you all might like to see how I keep my borders flat when quilting…

I start quilting from the center of my quilt, as taught in the “Tiny Stitches 2” book.  When I get to the borders, I take my quilt out of the hoop and attach a muslin “sleeve”.  (The sleeve I use over and over again.  I cut 2 yards of muslin in half lengthwise, sewed it up into a sleeve and then turn it right side out.  You can also use an old beach towel.)

Start by laying your quilt flat, extending the extra batting and backing.

 

Lay the quilt flat with the border extended.

Lay the quilt flat with the border extended.

 

Now baste your “sleeve” right sides together along the edge of the border through all 3 layers.  (I usually have to move the sleeve onto another side after I’ve finished quilting part of the border.)

Baste the sleeve onto the edge of the quilt.

Baste the sleeve onto the edge of the quilt.

 

When you put the quilt back into your hoop, you have an “extension” with the sleeve.  It helps the border to stay put when quilting and give you a nice FLAT border every time.

Ready to quilt the border.

Ready to quilt the border.

I finished the quilting in the late afternoon in time to have another scone!   Pass the clotted cream!

 

 

Cutting Up & Perle Cotton Tricks!

Hi, everyone.  While I working on my new Star Garden quilt, I took a picture of the cutting process.  Susan, a quilting friend, shared this trick with me several years ago and I love it and use it EVERY time I cut out a project.

Just put a towel on your lap as you cut and it catches all the bits and pieces.  When you are done, just pick up the towel and your pieces are ready for disposal.  You can also do this if you machine piece and need to cut off “dog ears.”  Too simple, yet  clever!  No more mess after cutting!

cutting 001 (640x427)

Catch all your bits onto a towel.

 

Here is another tip I use when I’m embroidering.  I LOVE valdani perle cotton.  Start all the balls and pull the ends of the thread through the top opening.  When you need a color, just select and pull out as much as you need!  The ball doesn’t roll away!  PERFECT!

If you purchase a set of my “Handwork in the Smokies” valdani collection, you get the zip pouch FREE!  (See the website under notions.)  The pouch will also hold a needle keeper and small 5″ hoop, so I organize all my embroidery supplies in one place.

Start all the balls and pull the ends through the end of the zipper.

Start all the balls and pull the ends through the end of the zipper.