How my stamps are made

I get some inquiries about my stamps and why I don’t use clear polypropylene. (I’ve tried polypropylene stamps and I’m not a fan.  They tend to stretch and you need to mount them exactly on a clear block.  The first stamps I tested were made of polypropylene and after a while they started to crack and dry out.)

Since I love seeing how things are made, I thought I’d run you by my process.  ALL my stamps are made in the US with quality US products by several small businesses, including mine.

First, I design something I might like to have made up in Corel.  I use a proportional scale because there is some shrinkage when the rubber is cooked.

Next I have a die and it’s reverse made up.  It is expensive to have a die made, so I do think about designs carefully before I have a die made.

die and reverse

Next the rubber is poured into the die and “cooked”.

Hot rubber coming your way!

The rubber “pancakes” are trimmed by hand and placed on a sticky back foam so they will have a “bounce” when using.

Sticky mount

Then they are hand cut AGAIN and laid on the appropriate size reforested wood.

Reforested California Hardwood

The wood is cut and sanded.

Sawing the wood.

Finally they are stuck onto the wood according to my design.  They are then packaged and mailed to me where I process them.

Remember the stamps are ALL mounted so that the finger holds should be aligned with the grain of the fabric.

Place fingers on the finger holds and stamp.

Hope you’ve enjoyed this trip to the factory today.  Until next time…

Happy Stamping!

 


Comments

How my stamps are made — 7 Comments

  1. Thanks Cindy. Very informative about making your stamps. You have a quality product and thanks for letting us see the process.

  2. Thankyou for the description and explanation….you are very smart to create these wonderful stamps! I love stamping, cutting and sewing and I love you for developing the whole method. So glad you’re here to share your wonderful ways! Thanks again

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